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20121112
20121112
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
they already agreed to that. i think you heard john boehner say that already. we've had votes in the senate where we've actually gotten rid of tax credits. i think that's a given. and i think the vast majority of americans agree with that. the question is how do you do that and how do you allow taxes to rise at the same time you fix the real problem? and the real problem is uncontrolled entitlement spending and a government that has grown massively. not just under this administration, under republican administration. >> let me turn to senator schumer on this point. >> so you have to approach both sides of it. >> let me turn to senator schumer. i'm going to ask you the same question. if the mandate is compromised, what do democrats have to be prepared to accept as a painful outcome in order to achieve compromise? >> well, i agree with you, the mandate is compromise. that's why we have a divided house and senate. and i think if the house stands for anything it's cut government spending, as tom coburn said, and i think we're going to have to do more of it. we heard the mandate in 2010, where i
uncertainty despite the president's comments and john boehner's comments. cheryl: we're looking at what we've been seeing over the last couple of months and you are saying kind of be prepared for that. a lot of the guests have come on and said you know, there's problems with earnings, but also you can't ignore that spike to the down side after the election. what did you make of all of that last week? what did you read into that? >> well, i mean, heading into the election, there was a lot of sentiment that the the market, the financial markets would have preferred a republican winner. cheryl: sure. fiscally more responsible if their view. -- in their view. >> correct. there's a few there's a lot of financial regulation presently and more to come. a lot of that at least from professional investors is probably where they were on wednesday. cheryl: they were waiting to see. >> i think that's going to settle off. i don't think you will see 300 point swings. you might see back again -- i'm quoting that period of july and august 2011, you could see 100, 150 on any given day, maybe a little bit ou
boehner immediately saying he generally supportive of trying to close the loop holes. do you see that as raising taxes? >> what boehner said and in the republican position since republican we should reduce rates have economic growth many of which are put in by obama for the solyndra green-type energy programs. let's bring the rates down. boehner was clear he wanted increase revenues it is not a tax increase to put more americans at work. if our recovery was growing the rate reagans did more americans would be at work. in terms of raising revenue which boehner grew about. if you grew the economy at reagan levels instead of two percent and obama and french levels, just growing faster and do that for a decade, the federal government gets trillions in taxes. we could undo the damage by having higher growth. >> gretchen: that's the difference in ideology. raise it to 3#.9 percent x. replace the alternative minimum tax with the buffet and raise the state tax and long-term capitol gains from 15-20. where do you think that those four points will go in negotiations with the republicans? >
. >> reporter: speaker boehner even told his republican members they would have to avoid nasty fights, and according to "the new york times," they seemed to listen. but those words don't change a basic disagreement that could push the country off the fiscal cliff, the first of january. that's when a number of tax cuts expire, dubbed taxmageddon, meaning the average family will pay an extra $3,700 a year. and severe cuts to defense and government spending will be trigg triggered. the sticking point on avoiding that cliff? taxes. the president campaigned on and won on letting tax cuts for the rich expire. today, a leading republican said no. >> no republican will vote for higher tax rates. >> reporter: if that sounds a lot like the argument we've already heard, you're right. and democrats appear emboldened that rates for the rich rise. >> if the republicans will not agree with that, we will reach a point at the end of this year where all the tax cuts expire and we'll start over next year. >> reporter: the two sides have four more days to lay out their markers. on friday, congressional l
boehner wants a temporary deal that extends all the bush tax cuts and buys more time. democrats don't want to extend attach cuts at all even temporarily. we know going over the cliff would throw us into a recession but experts say if it's reversed within a couple weeks it wouldn't be catastrophic. if the two sides cut a deal referred to as the grand bargain, it's preferable in theory, but with democrats and republicans so far apart, it is unclear what we might have to sacrifice in order to get that bargain. third, the two sides could negotiate around the issue of taxes. this is a little more complicated, unclear how it might work. there would be some sort of trade-off and it seems unlikely. the fourth possible scenario, create a patch to get us through the start of the year, which is a short term extension of the status quo something republicans would like, because it extends the bush tax cuts. president obama did that once in 2010 and is not willing to do it again. finally, we could procrastinate with a little down payment sending the message we will get to it. it would be a small package
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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